In Defense of Animals
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Helping the
Village Community


Madame Jacqueline is guided to her meeting
with Dr. Tidwell.

During his stay in Cameroon, Dr. Jim Tidwell and I traveled to eight small villages surrounding the Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center to perform eye examinations on dozens of local people who don’t have access to medical care. Dr. Tidwell diagnosed many conditions and recommended medications for some. He also taught me a lot about various maladies so that I might help people in the future. Ultimately, Dr. Tidwell removed cataracts from two women, Madame Jacqueline, who was completely blind, and Madame Awa, who was almost blind.

When Dr. Tidwell removed the bandage of Madame Jacqueline, the look on her face as she realized she could see, the pure joy reflected in her expression, brought tears to my own eyes. The next day she threw away the walking cane that she had carried constantly in the years since she had lost her vision. Madame Awa was also thrilled to have her vision restored. To these women and their families, and to me, Dr. Jim Tidwell is a saint.



IDA-Africa continues its popular Adopt-a-Chimpanzee Program. We are introducing one more wonderful individual in this publication.

Every chimpanzee resident of the Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center is a unique and special “person.” Your adoption helps to guarantee that each chimpanzee receives food and medical care essential to their life at the Rescue Center.

All donations support the Chimpanzee Rescue Center and are tax deductible.

Sponsor A Chimpanzee
~ click here ~

For a monthly donation of at least $15 for six months or longer, you will receive:

– an 8x10 photograph of your chimpanzee
– a full biography to tell you his/her story
– periodic updates and photos
– a handwritten Certificate of Guardianship

Most importantly, you will know you are making a real difference in the life of your new chimpanzee friend in Cameroon!


Corporate and school sponsorships are also available.


To learn of all chimpanzees in the sponsorship program, as well as the process to sponsor, please Click Here.



Our Newest Adittion

FOE
(male) Estimated DOB January 2002

In August 2002, a man in the village of Djouth bought a tiny, male chimpanzee infant from a hunter who had just killed his mother. The man kept the baby aliveby feeding him milk and cornflower. After a couple of months, when the baby started nibbling on fruit, the man stopped giving him any milk. In the very beginning, the baby was allowed to walk around freely on the man's property. Then some of the land was sold and the chimpanzee was becoming more active and getting into things, so he was forced into a small, chicken-wire cage, measuring 3x2x2 feet. And there he stayed until he was discovered by a Dutch visitor who was familiar with the Sanaga-Yong Center. She persuaded the man from Djouth to let her bring the infant chimpanzee to the Center on August 25, 2003, one year after his mother was killed.

At an emotionally frail age when Foe (pronounced Fo ea) most needed his mother’s love and tenderness, when his small muscles and bones needed activity to develop properly, he lived alone in debilitating confinement without hugs, caresses or proper nutrition. When he reached the Center, Foe was very thin and small for his age. The months of malnutrition and immobility had left him weak and uncoordinated. He manifested emotional trauma in painful self-injurious behaviors such as poking sticks deep into his ears. But with love and tender care from the staff, Foe soon stopped hurting himself and became strong and more self-confident. He now lives happily with three other babies - Berchi, Mika and new resident Massamba.


Updates From Cameroon

WELCOME MASSAMBA

Massamba at Sanaga-Yong shortly after his arrival

On April 24, 2004, after a six-month coordinated effort, we brought Massamba, a two year-old male, to the Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center in Cameroon from Cabinda, Angola.

On November 12, 2003, Israeli national Dr. Tamar Ron, biodiversity consultant with the United Nations Development Program in Angola, collaborated with the Angolan government and army who confiscated Massamba from a village where he was being held illegally by the hunter who had killed his mother and an adult male in the chimpanzee group. As there is no sanctuary for chimpanzee orphans in Angola, Army Commander Major Manuel Antonio Kitongo agreed to care for Massamba until a permanent home could be found.

Victoria Buesing, an American who was visiting Angola, found the Sanaga-Yong Center as a potential home and served as a liaison to American philanthropist and animal advocate Steven Bernheim, who agreed to finance the relocation and to give a very generous donation toward Massamba’s support at the Center. Dr. Ron then went to great lengths to secure the export permit in Angola and the Coordinator of the Biodiversity Project of Cabinda Province, Angolan national Alfredo Buza, arranged logistics for the transportation of Massamba from Angola to Point Noir, Congo.

On April 24, 2004, after a six-month coordinated effort, we brought Massamba, a two year-old male, to the Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center in Cameroon from Cabinda, Angola.

On November 12, 2003, Israeli national Dr. Tamar Ron, biodiversity consultant with the United Nations Development Program in Angola, collaborated with the Angolan government and army who confiscated Massamba from a village where he was being held illegally by the hunter who had killed his mother and an adult male in the chimpanzee group. As there is no sanctuary for chimpanzee orphans in Angola, Army Commander Major Manuel Antonio Kitongo agreed to care for Massamba until a permanent home could be found. Victoria Buesing, an American who was visiting Angola, found the Sanaga-Yong Center as a potential home and served as a liaison to American philanthropist and animal advocate Steven Bernheim, who agreed to finance the relocation and to give a very generous donation toward Massamba’s support at the Center. Dr. Ron then went to great lengths to secure the export permit in Angola and the Coordinator of the Biodiversity Project of Cabinda Province, Angolan national Alfredo Buza, arranged logistics for the transportation of Massamba from Angola to Point Noir, Congo.
 
Monica Puig MacLean, Spanish born volunteer at the Sanaga-Yong Center, flew to Point Noir to pick-up Massamba and bring him back to Cameroon. The Cameroon Ministry of the Environment and Forestry cooperated to the fullest extent in assuring the transfer.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this international effort on behalf of little Massamba.

More Sweet New Faces
Baby Issah was confiscated from a neighborhood chief in the town of Belabo in late February 2004. Volunteer Aude Verwilghen discovered the infant as the chief was trying to sell her. Dr. Sheri Speede brought it to the attention of the Chief of Post of the Ministry of the Environment and Forestry, Mr. Nsangou Njoya Issah, who seized the baby immediately and turned her over to the Sanaga-Yong Center. The women wanted to honor Mr. Issah by naming the baby chimpanzee after him. Baby Issah, who was about 10 months old, had been orphaned and taken captive one or two months prior to the confiscation.

Baby Akiba was brought to the Center in March 2004, when she was less than five months old, by a former employee who said he took her from a hunter in a village about 80 kilometers away. Akiba’s mother had been killed only 2-3 days before. When she arrived at the Center she was dehydrated and so weak that she could hold her head up and her eyes open for only a few seconds at a time. However, she immediately accepted a baby bottle, like she had been drinking baby milk formula from a manmade bottle all of her life. By the end of the first day, she was stronger and more alert. Akiba means "thank you" in one of the local dialects in Cameroon.

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